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Top (9) hardest names to pronounce in football history

Some football players have unusual surnames; some of them have familiar names; However, some have names that even the most seasoned experts find difficult to pronounce. Accents and even the length of the player name can help. So let's examine which names are the hardest in football history. 

 

 1. Fábio Coentrão 


 is the pronunciation of Fabēō Kōin'trow. While the name doesn't seem very difficult, the middle syllable of the Portuguese player name is short enough to be overlooked or exaggerated. Commentators often miss the syllable, resulting in a pronunciation that sounds more like "Kuntrow". 

 

 2. Anthony Réveillère 

 

 

 

 Antōnē Rā'vāyair. This French man's name is a nightmare if you don't know much about the French language. The "th" in your first name is pronounced as "t" and not as we say "think". The first "e" in his last name has an accent that sounds similar to the "a" in the recording; the "ei" that follows the "v" has the same sound. The "ll" sounds almost like a "y", and the last three are the same "air" that we breathe. 


 3. Imants Bleidelis 



 The Latvian midfielder spent three years in Southampton but only played two Premier League games during that time and is likely to drop out as one of the Saints' worst players in recent years. His native Skonto FC, the third-biggest Latvian of all time, landed at Dell in 2009, and Leidelis was not welcomed by Southampton fans, who were undoubtedly relieved to see his name alone on the roster once or twice. 

 

 4. Yevhen Konoplyanka 


 Yĕven Kōnō'plēangka. This young Ukrainian is destined for big things and rumours circulate that he will be moving to Old Trafford or Anfield. But what will they call it there? The pronunciation of konoplyanka is quite phonetic, but speaking it is a challenge. 

 

 5. Sime Vrsaljko 

 

 

 

 Croatian right-back Sime Vrsaljko, who currently plays for Atlético de Madrid, is next on our list of the hardest-to-pronounce names in football history. Vrsaljko joined the La Liga giants in 2016, but while on loan at Inter, he built a reputation for his game which resulted in a significant increase in his market value, which almost doubled by a single season. The time at Atlético de Madrid was not as successful as he and his fans had hoped, as the Croatian international quickly turned into a disaster at the club that reportedly spent € 14m on his services. 


 6. Benjamin Mwaruwari 



 Despite his ridiculous last name, Benjani will be one of the most recognizable Premier League players on this list, which is believed to be why it is so low. During his tenure in the top division, the Zimbabwean striker has a strong record in the English top division, having played for Portsmouth, Manchester City, Blackburn Rovers and Sunderland. 

 

 7. K being Sigþorsson 


 Kolbeinn Sigþorsson's name is undoubtedly one of the most difficult names to pronounce in football history, as even parts of his characters are unknown and foreign to many other countries. Sigórsson is a 31-year-old centre forward for IFK Gothenburg. on March 14, 1990, The Icelandic international has had a long and illustrious career and has represented some of the most prestigious clubs in Europe. 


 8. Efstathios Tavlaridis 


 Traditional Greek names have been causing problems for Premier League fans for years, with Bolton's Kostas Konstantinidis and Liverpool's Sotirio Kyrgiakos being particularly difficult to pronounce, but none more than former Arsenal defender Efstathios Tavlaridis. The former Greece international was signed by Arsenal for £ 1m in 2001 as a 21-year-old prospect. Over three years, the centre-back made eight appearances for Arsenal, but only once in the Premier League. He then played for Lille in France, where he celebrated some successes. 

 

 9. Henrikh Mkhitaryan 

 

 

 

 Henrick is a pronunciation of Henrick. Except for the silent "h" at the end, the initial name is very simple. Surname, on the other hand, begins with three consonants in a row.

Content created and supplied by: MotheloNews (via Opera News )

Fabēō Kōin'trow Fábio Coentrão Portuguese

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