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The problem with over parenting

One of the most common problems I see in teenagers, and especially wealthy teenagers, is a lack of a real sense of identity.


Many of these teenagers have the outward appearance of success as they tend to be personable, academically successful, and good at sports. But this outer facade hides your inner confusion, despair, and often a lack of real intrinsic motivation.

This is usually caused by overly committed parents or parents who care too much about the outside world, such as These parents are tied to their fear of not having a high performing child, and their fear usually spreads to their children.


As a result, these teenagers suck the life out of them and end up doing things and living their lives to please others, be they their parents, teachers, coaches, or friends.


This leads to a feeling of emptiness in them that drains their motivation and creativity. Many of these parents step in for their children when a problem arises. As a result, your child develops a learned form of helplessness and deprives them of valuable opportunities to develop their self-confidence.


As children grow, they need and want to make more decisions for themselves. If parents instead made the decision to encourage their child to solve problems and support their child's efforts, this would allow them to gain valuable experience and self-esteem.


Many well-meaning parents hamper their children's ability to develop self-esteem by comparing their teens to other teens, pressuring them to use external measures of success, such as prestigious schools or high-paying professions, and being overly critical of whatever decisions they make . Lack of self-esteem is closely related to almost all emotional disorders such as depression, anxiety, anorexia, and cuts.


Children today are so planned that they miss one of the most important ingredients for building self-esteem: unstructured play and free time. Children also need time to dream and daydream almost as much as all human beings need sleep to rest and regenerate their bodies.

It is immensely important to their development and discovery of who they are, and critical to their future happiness. Young people from affluent backgrounds are particularly at risk of later emotional problems, as they are rarely given the opportunity to practice and learn self-management skills.


This is often because one or more parents are so focused on their children's “happiness” that they feel compelled to limit any frustration or fear in their children's lives.

Content created and supplied by: Us_News (via Opera News )

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