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A root allegedly used by women to prevent pregnancy left everyone speechless

There are a lot of things which people follow based on their culture. In African countries people tend to follow traditions and live their lives without using western products. In a recent post by Africa Archives, it was brought to people's attention that a root of an Acaca specie was used as contraception by Africans. This left everyone speechless because most people were not aware of such a root. This is a root of an Acacia specie, it is a contraceptive used by Africans in Ancient times. It was chewed by women about once a week to prevent pregnancy. https://t.co/gJlKXXTe8u

People's comments:

"Of course, no one could deny that traditional medicine were very impactive. Only that they lacked proper description for the right and required dosage."

We were blessed. We still are. Finding answers to every single thing concerning the human health but the ignorance inculcated on us by the people who exploited on our lands made some of these natural healers and it's practicality generally unacceptable in a "civilised" society.

"Is it well enough researched? How many roots do you have to chew to prevent a pregnancy for a week, an entire tree or two? Would you rather chew a tree bark than pop a pill?"

How did we discover this in the past without any European help? We are so blessed.

Acacia, commonly known as the wattles or acacias, is a large genus of shrubs and trees in the subfamily Mimosoideae of the pea family Fabaceae. Initially, it comprised a group of plant species native to Africa and Australasia, but it has now been limited to contain only the Australasian species.

Share your thoughts on the comment section, did you know of this root or not?

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Sources

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acacia

https://twitter.com/Africa_Archives/status/1418984422674731010?s=19

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Acacia Africa Archives African Africans

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