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Meet The African Tribe That Tie Their Heads Tightly Untill It Forms This Shape

Meet The African Tribe That Tie Their Heads Tightly Untill It Forms This Shape

This is a ritual from our lovely African continent that has gotten a lot of attention in recent years, and I'd want to call your attention to it. The fact that it is still being done today, despite the start of the colonial era and the emergence of greater technology, is particularly significant.

Some of the things that our dearly beloved continent of Africa performs in terms of its customs and traditions are pretty hilarious and great to watch, so please correct me if I'm wrong. Some African rites are so unpleasant and distressing in a strange way that it becomes difficult to understand why they are performed in the first place. To illustrate, consider the following scenario: you give birth to a beautiful new baby, and then you firmly wrap its head in clothing to compel it to adopt a different form.


They have a physical appearance that makes them appear much more ridiculous than they actually are. It is unfortunate that this barbarous behavior has continued to be performed despite the entrance of the white man and the rise of civilisation. The Mangbetu ethnic community in the Democratic Republic of the Congo has a long-standing history of conducting this ceremony for their kin. Their custom of tightly tying the head of a newly born infant with a wrapper or cloth in order for the head to be stretched and create a cone-like shape, which they refer to as "cone-tying," is still practiced today.


Isn't it a little amusing? Lipombo is the name they give it, and for these people, the shape represents beauty. Apparently, they feel that elongating their skulls makes them look more beautiful and distinctive, which is incredible to consider. Please see below some further photographs of the Mangbetu people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, who are distinguished by their long heads.

Wwhich brings us to our next question: what are your thoughts on the tradition and practice in question? Is it conceivable for you to let anything like this to happen to your son or daughter? You may also follow me on Twitter and Instagram for more intriguing updates if you like, share, and comment on my posts.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mangbetu_people

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