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Major side effects of eating too many avocados

Because of the abundance of research showing to its health benefits, the avocado has become a symbol of healthy nutrition. This health-conscious favorite is prized for its monounsaturated fat content and other helpful ingredients that can help you live a healthier life.

"Avocados are a heart-healthy source of fat," Toby Smithson, MS, RDN, CDE, a registered dietitian nutritionist, told Eatthis.com. "They are cholesterol- and saturated-fat-free. Consuming the excellent form of fat (unsaturated) found in avocados has been linked to higher levels of good cholesterol (HDL) in studies." Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies is written by Smithson.


Avocados are also popular since they are simple to incorporate into a healthy diet. In fact, there are over 2,100 avocado-based snacks and dinners on Food.com alone, so you'll be hard-pressed to run out of ideas. Avocados, despite their healthy appearance, aren't a plant you'd want to eat for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. If you consume too many avocados, you may experience certain unpleasant side effects that you are unaware of. Continue reading to learn more about the unintended consequences of eating too much avocado.


Weight gain 


Avocados are high in calories. "While nutrient density is more important than calorie density for health," says nutritionist Lisa Moskovitz, RD, CDN, CEO of the NY Nutrition Group and member of the Eat This, Not That! Medical Expert Board, "if you're trying to manage weight, eating excessive amounts of avocados, I'm talking about more than 1 per day, can lead to a surplus of energy that increases fat stores." "Of course, it all depends on the individual and what they consume the remainder of the day."


Migraine Headache


Avocados are high in tyrosine, an amino acid that the body naturally converts to tyramine. Avocado's tyramine has been connected to migraine headaches, as excessive levels of tyramine can cause migraines and raise blood pressure, according to research. Avocado is one of the foods to "Use With Caution" if you get headaches, according to the National Headache Foundation.


Allergic Reactions


After eating a lot of avocado, some people have moderate oral allergic reactions, such as itching lips, mouth, and throat, according to doctors and dietitians. According to a study published in the journal Biochemical Society Transactions, up to half of those allergic to natural latex are also hypersensitive to plant foods such as avocado, banana, tomato, peach, and bell peppers.


Drug interactions 


Avocados include vitamin K, a blood clotting ingredient that, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), may reduce the effects of blood-thinning drugs like warfarin, which can put you at risk for dangerous blood clots. One avocado contains 42 micrograms of vitamin K, or 35% of the recommended daily intake of 120 micrograms. Consult your doctor before making any large dietary changes, especially if you are a heart patient using blood thinners, to avoid potential food-drug interactions.

Content created and supplied by: ArchieAndrews (via Opera News )

Avocados CDE RDN Toby Smithson

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