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TIPS: How To Prevent (Monkeypox Virus) From Affecting You

TIPS: Things You Can Do To Prevent Monkeypox Virus From Affecting You

The monkeypox virus is common in central Africa.

Monkeypox spreads through direct contact with body fluids or sores on the body of someone who has monkeypox, or with direct contact with materials that have touched body fluids or sores, such as clothing or linens. It may also spread through respiratory secretions when people have close, face-to-face contact.

Avoid contact with animals that could harbor the virus (including animals that are sick or that have been found dead in areas where monkeypox occurs). Avoid contact with any materials, such as bedding, that has been in contact with a sick animal. Isolate infected patients from others who could be at risk for infection. It is very easy for someone to get monkeypox by coming into contact with recently contaminated materials like clothing, bedding and other linens used by an infected person or animal.


Transmission via droplet respiratory particles usually requires prolonged face-to-face contact, which puts health workers, household members and other close contacts of active cases at greater risk. However, the longest documented chain of transmission in a community has risen in recent years from 6 to 9 successive person-to-person infections.

However, not everyone with monkeypox develops all of the symptoms. In fact, in the current (2022) outbreak, many cases aren’t following the usual pattern of symptoms. This atypical presentation includes only a few lesions, no swollen lymph nodes, less fever and other signs of illness. You can have it and not know it. But even if you don’t show many signs of infection, you can spread still spread it to others through prolonged close contact.

Signs and symptoms

The incubation period (interval from infection to onset of symptoms) of monkeypox is usually from 6 to 13 days but can range from 5 to 21 days.

The infection can be divided into two periods:

the invasion period (lasts between 0–5 days) characterized by fever, intense headache, lymphadenopathy (swelling of the lymph nodes), back pain, myalgia (muscle aches) and intense asthenia (lack of energy). Lymphadenopathy is a distinctive feature of monkeypox compared to other diseases that may initially appear similar (chickenpox, measles, smallpox).

How can monkeypox be contained?


According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization, monkeypox is unlikely to become a pandemic. At this time, the threat to the general public is not high. The focus is on identifying possible cases and containing the outbreak as soon as possible.

Source: https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/monkeypox

Content created and supplied by: Sir_Desiire (via Opera News )

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