Sign in
Download Opera News App

Health

 

Health Living

 

Disease prevention and treatment

Lady in labor notices doctor acting strange, she looks done at his feet and freezes in shock

AIDS is caused by the virus or bacteria HIV (AIDS). Several actions increase HIV risk. Confirmation of infection requires an HIV test.

AIDS and HIV are not the same. Some people develop AIDS gradually. HIV/AIDS cannot be cured. "AIDS" refers to HIV-infected individuals who have low T-cell levels, uncomfortable infections, or malignancy.

HIV must be dealt with.

HIV-infected body fluids have the ability to enter your bloodstream. Blood, sperm, vaginal fluids, and breast milk are all examples of body fluids.

The mouth, anus, penis, vagina, or a skin break are all possible entry points for the virus. Anyone can contract HIV.

People with HIV can still spread it. Women who are HIV positive run the danger of infecting their unborn kids.

If a person shares a needle and has sex with an HIV-positive person, their risk of contracting HIV increases.

HIV indications

A month or two after infection, some patients suffer flu-like symptoms. stage one. Within weeks or months, these symptoms typically go away on their own. Years may pass before HIV starts to cause illness in your body. Long-term events, or clinical latency, are these.

How to detect HIV in your spouse, according to a doctor. HIV individuals frequently get OIs and malignancy.

Lymphoma, Kaposi's Sarcoma, and invasive cervical and anal cancer are more common in AIDS patients. They raise the risk of respiratory, throat, and oral malignancies.

Thrush results from candida. Lips, the vagina, or other bodily areas may become infected. Skin, nails, and other physical parts are included in this.

However, esophageal or pulmonary thrush can be harmful (trachea, bronchi, lung tissue).

Common causes include Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pneumocystis jirovecii.

Salmonella can get into people's systems through tainted food and beverages. Vomiting and diarrhoea are present.

Source: https://www.webmd.com/hiv-aids/partner-has-hiv

https://www.everydayhealth.com/hiv-aids/faqs-for-when-your-partner-has-hiv/

Content created and supplied by: MzansiHealth (via Opera News )

COMMENTS

Load app to read more comments