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Giant Moa, The 11ft Bird That Lays Eggs Of About 10 Inches, Was Hunted To Extinction By Humans

The South Island Giant Moa, often known as the Giant Moa, is a species of flightless birds that is a member of the Moa family and the Dinornithiformes order. It is the largest of the Moa family's flightless birds. These creatures were found on the South Island of New Zealand, including Rakiura, where they lived in lowlands (grassland, forest, duneland, and shrubland).


What did they eat was a mystery.


Because of the morphology of its beak and skull, it is assumed that the huge Moa subsisted on twigs, flowers, berries, leaves, and even seeds from the smaller branches of trees during their lifetime.


What size were they?

The Giant Moa were large birds, with the largest being about 6ft 6in (2 metres) high at the back and reaching a folliage of about 11ft 10in (3.6 metres) above the ground, weighing up to 230 kg. The Giant Moa were large birds, with the largest being about 6ft 6in (2 metres) high at the back and reaching a folliage of about 11ft 10in (3.6 metres) above the ground, weighing up to 230 kg (510 lb).

What size were their eggs?


They could only lay one egg at a time, which was around 18cm (7in) in diameter, 25cm (10in) length, and weighed approximately 4kg. They could only lay one egg at a time.


Lifespan


Though their exact longevity has not yet been determined, based on their biological characteristics, it has been predicted that they could live for up to 50 years or longer due to the absence of predators.


When and how did they go extinct are still up in the air.

An investigation by the University of Auckland and Landcare Research Scientists estimates that the giant moa went extinct between 1440-1445 AD, which corresponds to approximately 500-600 years ago, as a result of excessive hunting, egg stealing and habitat reduction as a result of human forest clearance.


More:

https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo/giant-moa.html

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Giant Moa Moa New Zealand Rakiura South Island

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