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Women Are Better Construction Workers Than Men - Opinion

Construction is derived from Latin constructio (from com- "together" and struere "to pile up") and Old French construction, and refers to the art and science of forming items, systems, or organizations. The verb construct refers to the act of building, whereas the noun construction refers to the way something is built and the type of its structure.

Construction, in its most common sense, refers to the processes involved in constructing buildings, infrastructure, and industrial facilities, as well as related operations, from start to finish. Construction normally begins with planning, finance, and design and continues until the asset is finished and ready for use; it also includes repairs and maintenance, any expansion, extension, or improvement work, and the asset's final deconstruction, dismantling, or decommissioning.

Construction employs roughly 7% of the worldwide population (over 273 million people) and accounts for more than 10% of global GDP (6% in affluent countries). In 2017, the worldwide construction industry's production was predicted to be worth $10.8 trillion.

The construction industry is known to be an industry that is very male-dominated and not a lot of women get into the industry, and those who do get into the industry get undermined for their ability to do the work as well as their male counterparts. It also becomes unusual for many people when women get into industries that are normally not considered for women, because for years, women have been put into jobs where society feels they are for women and are soft.

But with the new age, we see a lot of women getting to break boundaries and do what they love and are passionate about. Some women are into construction and they do a far better job than men. They just get to be judged differently because they are women.

I think that women do a far better job than men because they think critically about everything.

Content created and supplied by: Opinion.Nation (via Opera News )

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